COVID-19

We are still open as usual for free home delivery in the Brighton and Hove area, same day wherever possible (we're quite busy; please bear with us!). If you're not sure what you want and fancy some suggestions, simply call us on 01273553353 (for our Fiveways, Brighton shop) or 01273820320 (for the Portland Road, Hove shop). If you’re happy you know what you want, please just go right ahead and order online now.

We look forward to hearing from you!

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The Organic Case

We’re aware of just how much interest there is these days in organics, biodynamics, and sustainable production, and our customers increasingly request organic wine. We’re generally more than happy to comply.  Although we are primarily looking for good (and good value) wines, we find that a lot of our products by coincidence tend to be made by producers who make more long term decisions in the vineyard. This means their grapes arrive in the winery in very good condition, with a real inherent sense of the place they were grown; the ‘terroir’. This in turn means they can intervene less in the winemaking process.  Thus these tend to be more ‘natural’, whether or not they have some formal certification, and we really like that.

Just a quick word to the wise, though;

1/. Organic/biodynamic means it’s good for the vineyard. Less (or organic) fungicide, herbicide, and fertiliser is being used.  It doesn’t necessarily mean you’re going to dodge a hangover!!  Organic wines still contain alcohol. Don’t expect a health miracle here!

2/. ‘Natural’. Beware this word. It has no legal meaning, in wine terms.  Thus we can quite happily say that every single wine in our shop is Natural, and so can anyone else, from Tesco to your local farm stall.

In truth, the term Natural is now widely used to refer to a wine that may be made by someone dabbling in any or all of; organics, biodynamics, natural yeast fermentation (as opposed to cultured winemaking yeast), unusual machinery or tanks, no filtration, no fining, and so on.  Producers always proclaim they want to show off their ‘terroir’.  A number of people are making dirty, orange or brown coloured wines that taste more like cider, that fade and age in a matter of months, but somehow justify this by saying, “Oh, It’s Ok because it’s Natural. That’s the terroir talking.” No, it isn’t. Filthy wine is just filthy wine. It’s a noble cause, but it’s producing some disastrous results. So beware.

Right, lecture over! Please find below a mixed six of our favourite, more recent additions, which also happen to be organic, most certified, some not. There are one of two slightly unusual flavours here, be prepared for that, but generally we have chosen these wines primarily because we like their taste. We hope you agree. As always with these cases, it comes with a healthy discount, from £82.45 down to £72.50 – £10 off.

Baglio Antico Catarratto 2019, Italy – New to us; slightly funky, nutty/caramel/oxidative character, really lovely mouthfeel, rich and textured.

Cullerot, Celler del Roure 2018, Spain – made using a hotchpotch ‘field blend’ (literally, whatever’s growing in the field) of grapes from near Valencia, fermented in amphorae. Lovely fresh salinity and vibrancy, really clean citrus and stone fruit.

Lo Petit Fantet d’Hippolyte white blend 2019, France – another field blend made in Corbieres. The red has been popular for years with us but we’ve recently taken on the white blend too; again, lovely rich texture to this wine.

Clos de St Jean ‘Tradition’ 2018, France – From the Cote Roannaise, technically in the Loire Valley, but this is made from Gamay, and is near to Beaujolais. We treat it like good quality Village Cru level wine such as Morgon or Fleurie; it has similar quality and the same bright, open red fruit feel.

Aguijon de Abeja Malbec, Patagonia, Argentina – From a wonderful new region called Lujan de Cuyo in Neuquen. Juicy blackberry fruit, black pepper, dark chocolate, exotic spices and a refreshing acidity that makes it a wonderful food wine.

Le Naturel Garnacha, Navarra, Spain – Whistle clean, tart fresh raspberry character and herbs in this, with a bracing, edgy finish that suits grilled meat. This has nothing added at all in the production, as with a number of these wines.

Product Type: Wine

Wine Colour: Red, White

Out of stock

Decoration
,

The Organic Case

We’re aware of just how much interest there is these days in organics, biodynamics, and sustainable production, and our customers increasingly request organic wine. We’re generally more than happy to comply.  Although we are primarily looking for good (and good value) wines, we find that a lot of our products by coincidence tend to be made by producers who make more long term decisions in the vineyard. This means their grapes arrive in the winery in very good condition, with a real inherent sense of the place they were grown; the ‘terroir’. This in turn means they can intervene less in the winemaking process.  Thus these tend to be more ‘natural’, whether or not they have some formal certification, and we really like that.

Just a quick word to the wise, though;

1/. Organic/biodynamic means it’s good for the vineyard. Less (or organic) fungicide, herbicide, and fertiliser is being used.  It doesn’t necessarily mean you’re going to dodge a hangover!!  Organic wines still contain alcohol. Don’t expect a health miracle here!

2/. ‘Natural’. Beware this word. It has no legal meaning, in wine terms.  Thus we can quite happily say that every single wine in our shop is Natural, and so can anyone else, from Tesco to your local farm stall.

In truth, the term Natural is now widely used to refer to a wine that may be made by someone dabbling in any or all of; organics, biodynamics, natural yeast fermentation (as opposed to cultured winemaking yeast), unusual machinery or tanks, no filtration, no fining, and so on.  Producers always proclaim they want to show off their ‘terroir’.  A number of people are making dirty, orange or brown coloured wines that taste more like cider, that fade and age in a matter of months, but somehow justify this by saying, “Oh, It’s Ok because it’s Natural. That’s the terroir talking.” No, it isn’t. Filthy wine is just filthy wine. It’s a noble cause, but it’s producing some disastrous results. So beware.

Right, lecture over! Please find below a mixed six of our favourite, more recent additions, which also happen to be organic, most certified, some not. There are one of two slightly unusual flavours here, be prepared for that, but generally we have chosen these wines primarily because we like their taste. We hope you agree. As always with these cases, it comes with a healthy discount, from £82.45 down to £72.50 – £10 off.

Baglio Antico Catarratto 2019, Italy – New to us; slightly funky, nutty/caramel/oxidative character, really lovely mouthfeel, rich and textured.

Cullerot, Celler del Roure 2018, Spain – made using a hotchpotch ‘field blend’ (literally, whatever’s growing in the field) of grapes from near Valencia, fermented in amphorae. Lovely fresh salinity and vibrancy, really clean citrus and stone fruit.

Lo Petit Fantet d’Hippolyte white blend 2019, France – another field blend made in Corbieres. The red has been popular for years with us but we’ve recently taken on the white blend too; again, lovely rich texture to this wine.

Clos de St Jean ‘Tradition’ 2018, France – From the Cote Roannaise, technically in the Loire Valley, but this is made from Gamay, and is near to Beaujolais. We treat it like good quality Village Cru level wine such as Morgon or Fleurie; it has similar quality and the same bright, open red fruit feel.

Aguijon de Abeja Malbec, Patagonia, Argentina – From a wonderful new region called Lujan de Cuyo in Neuquen. Juicy blackberry fruit, black pepper, dark chocolate, exotic spices and a refreshing acidity that makes it a wonderful food wine.

Le Naturel Garnacha, Navarra, Spain – Whistle clean, tart fresh raspberry character and herbs in this, with a bracing, edgy finish that suits grilled meat. This has nothing added at all in the production, as with a number of these wines.

Product Type: Wine

Wine Colour: Red, White

Out of stock

Decoration
,

The Organic Case

We’re aware of just how much interest there is these days in organics, biodynamics, and sustainable production, and our customers increasingly request organic wine. We’re generally more than happy to comply.  Although we are primarily looking for good (and good value) wines, we find that a lot of our products by coincidence tend to be made by producers who make more long term decisions in the vineyard. This means their grapes arrive in the winery in very good condition, with a real inherent sense of the place they were grown; the ‘terroir’. This in turn means they can intervene less in the winemaking process.  Thus these tend to be more ‘natural’, whether or not they have some formal certification, and we really like that.

Just a quick word to the wise, though;

1/. Organic/biodynamic means it’s good for the vineyard. Less (or organic) fungicide, herbicide, and fertiliser is being used.  It doesn’t necessarily mean you’re going to dodge a hangover!!  Organic wines still contain alcohol. Don’t expect a health miracle here!

2/. ‘Natural’. Beware this word. It has no legal meaning, in wine terms.  Thus we can quite happily say that every single wine in our shop is Natural, and so can anyone else, from Tesco to your local farm stall.

In truth, the term Natural is now widely used to refer to a wine that may be made by someone dabbling in any or all of; organics, biodynamics, natural yeast fermentation (as opposed to cultured winemaking yeast), unusual machinery or tanks, no filtration, no fining, and so on.  Producers always proclaim they want to show off their ‘terroir’.  A number of people are making dirty, orange or brown coloured wines that taste more like cider, that fade and age in a matter of months, but somehow justify this by saying, “Oh, It’s Ok because it’s Natural. That’s the terroir talking.” No, it isn’t. Filthy wine is just filthy wine. It’s a noble cause, but it’s producing some disastrous results. So beware.

Right, lecture over! Please find below a mixed six of our favourite, more recent additions, which also happen to be organic, most certified, some not. There are one of two slightly unusual flavours here, be prepared for that, but generally we have chosen these wines primarily because we like their taste. We hope you agree. As always with these cases, it comes with a healthy discount, from £82.45 down to £72.50 – £10 off.

Baglio Antico Catarratto 2019, Italy – New to us; slightly funky, nutty/caramel/oxidative character, really lovely mouthfeel, rich and textured.

Cullerot, Celler del Roure 2018, Spain – made using a hotchpotch ‘field blend’ (literally, whatever’s growing in the field) of grapes from near Valencia, fermented in amphorae. Lovely fresh salinity and vibrancy, really clean citrus and stone fruit.

Lo Petit Fantet d’Hippolyte white blend 2019, France – another field blend made in Corbieres. The red has been popular for years with us but we’ve recently taken on the white blend too; again, lovely rich texture to this wine.

Clos de St Jean ‘Tradition’ 2018, France – From the Cote Roannaise, technically in the Loire Valley, but this is made from Gamay, and is near to Beaujolais. We treat it like good quality Village Cru level wine such as Morgon or Fleurie; it has similar quality and the same bright, open red fruit feel.

Aguijon de Abeja Malbec, Patagonia, Argentina – From a wonderful new region called Lujan de Cuyo in Neuquen. Juicy blackberry fruit, black pepper, dark chocolate, exotic spices and a refreshing acidity that makes it a wonderful food wine.

Le Naturel Garnacha, Navarra, Spain – Whistle clean, tart fresh raspberry character and herbs in this, with a bracing, edgy finish that suits grilled meat. This has nothing added at all in the production, as with a number of these wines.

Product Type: Wine

Wine Colour: Red, White

Out of stock

Decoration

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